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Tag Archives: vote

David Davenport: The Lost Art of Political Compromise

Compromise

Among many lost arts in Washington the most problematic is the lost art of compromise.

The dictionary says compromise includes the root word “com” or together with the word promise:  We make promises by coming together.  America learned this early, with the Constitutional Convention full of compromises.

But now members of Congress vote not to find the best solution for the country but the best platform for their next election.   Democrats threatened to shut the entire government over dreamer immigrants, while Trump was willing to see a shutdown over his wall.  And so it goes, politicians standing firm on one issue or another which they believe will get them reelected, and the whole of the federal government is held hostage.

We need more politicians like Ronald Reagan, who told House Speaker Tip O’Neill, “I will take half a loaf today, but I will come back for the other half tomorrow.”

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Michael Medved: A Vote Is a Terrible Thing to Waste

Opioid

When legal wrangling concludes, control of the Virginia legislature will be decided by drawing lots, or pulling names from a bowl—because of a tie vote in the 94th District. Republican incumbent David Yancey and challenger Shelly Simonds both got 11,608 votes but if the Democrat wins the draw, the legislature’s lower house will split 50-50, ending an era of Republican dominance. Imagine: if a single Virginia Republican had gotten off his apathy to go to the polls, the conservative—who won the district last time by 15 percentage points—would still hold the seat and, with it, the legislature.

 

On Election Day, a little-known Libertarian candidate who barely campaigned drew 675 votes. If this fringie had gotten a hundred fewer votes it would have changed nothing; but if just one of his deluded followers had backed the Republican it would have changed everything.

 

Remember: your vote is too precious, too powerful to waste on laziness or feckless gestures.

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David Davenport: Civic Education To Save The Republic

Compromise

A recent report reminds us that if the future of the American republic is in question, doing a better job with civic education is the answer.

The report for the “Democracy at a Crossroads National Summit” provides plenty of reasons for pessimism: people don’t trust their government, they don’t vote, they don’t take part in churches or other civic organizations like they used to. And young people lack civic knowledge, with only 23% of high school seniors scoring at a proficient level on tests.

But some states are awakening to the solution: better civic education in our schools. Florida now requires a middle school course in civics and tests the students, with strong results. Illinois requires a high school civics course, and other states are looking at new requirements.

The report is surely right when it says, “Civic learning, when done properly, is the best vehicle to train young people to sustain our democracy.” I hope it’s coming soon to your state.

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Hugh Hewitt: Senate Republicans And The Logjam On Judicial Nominees

U.S. Senate

President Trump recently decried the inability of Congress to approve his court nominees. “We have some of the most qualified people,” he said. “They’re waiting forever on line . . . it’s not fair.”

More than anyone else, Sen. Charles E. Grassley, chair of the Judiciary Committee, methodically frustrates the one offering that establishment D.C. can make to conservatives in the countryside by continuing to defend blue slips. The blue slip is simply the piece of paper that is sent to the senators from the home state of every judicial nominee, allowing the senators to approve or veto the nominee. Blue slips would be anathema to our Constitutional framers and need to go.

It is simply inexplicable that any federal-court vacancies could be left unfilled a year after Trump’s inauguration.

If Senate Republicans don’t want the majority, they are doing everything exactly right. If they do like their positions of authority, then burn the blue slips and stay in session until every judicial nominee has a hearing and a vote.

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