Tag Archives: Washington

Jerry Bowyer: An Opportunity for Trump

President Trump is officially launching his re-election campaign on June 20th in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Before Tulsa’s black residents were massacred by a racist mob in 1921, Tulsa was home to what was known as “Black Wall Street”—a hub for an emerging class of affluent black entrepreneurs.

In the decades after the Civil War, former slave Booker T. Washington spear-headed the creation of a black entrepreneurial class through his Tuskegee Institute—rooted in the Biblical foundations of human dignity and the merit of hard-work: Washington wrote that the black slave came out of bondage “with a hammer and a saw in his hands and a Bible in his hands.”

The president has an opportunity to shift the conversation towards the heroic successes of black people—despite the troubling history.

He can shift the focus from victimhood to victory. I hope he uses it.

 

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus and the National Debt

What do coronavirus and the national debt have in common?  The answer is China.  Due in part to secrecy and poor management in China, suddenly the world confronts a major pandemic.  We’re reminded how interconnected our world is and how vulnerable we are to China.

Perhaps this is a reason to take the national debt more seriously.  China owns approximately 5 percent of our debt and some surprise there could have a major economic effect on the US.  It could be the next housing bubble and we are woefully unprepared.

A recent report by the Congressional Budget Office says our debt will equal 98% of the nation’s total economic output by 2030.  President Trump promised to eliminate the deficit in 8 years but what we’ve seen is a nearly 50 percent increase.

Let’s tell Washington to take the debt seriously and beware a bad surprise.

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David Davenport: The Elephant In The Policy Room


You would never know this listening to presidential candidates but Social Security, in crisis mode for a while, will begin paying out more than it takes in next year. The reserve fund will be depleted in 16 years, meaning seniors would face 20 percent cuts in their payments.

Roughly half of Americans rely on Social Security for most of their retirement income. And with baby boomers retiring and living longer, the numbers will only get worse.

While Democrats talk about welfare and socialism, and Republicans love their tax cuts, we still need to pay for the entitlements we already have such as Social Security and Medicare.

Fixing this will take several things Washington hardly does anymore: exercise fiscal discipline, debate and deliberate, and come to some kind of bipartisan agreement.

Party line vote—the new normal in Washington—will not do the trick

Social Security needs a fix.

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Michael Medved: An Astonishing Legacy


During the holiday season, an astonishing legacy inspired Seattle. A single, childless social worker named Alan Naiman died of cancer at 63; he had become known to his friends for “unabashed thriftiness that veered into comical,” holding together his battered shoes with duct tape.

But when he died, he left $11 million to children’s charities that helped the poor, disabled and abandoned. He scrimped, saved and invested, while working three jobs, so he could help kids he never met.  Because he left everything to charity, government imposed no “death tax” on his wealth, but had he directed it to relatives, or even designated strangers, the State of Washington would have imposed its crushing estate tax.

This case demonstrates why government should keep hands off honestly earned, previously taxed life-savings, while honoring wishes of the deceased on their designated distribution.

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Albert Mohler: Earth-shaking Developments in the Catholic Church


The recent revelations of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church are unprecedented. I’m referring first to the Grand Jury report that came from Pennsylvania. That was followed by the report from the former ambassador from the Vatican to the United States of America. Archbishop Vigano, in his 11-page letter, accuses the highest leadership of the Catholic church—including the Pope himself—of covering up this sexual corruption and, specifically, protecting the now-disgraced former Cardinal Archbishop in Washington, D.C.

We have as a result one of the biggest stories in international religious life over the course of our lifetimes.

We are witnessing right now earth-shaking developments within the Roman Catholic Church—developments that should be of interest not only to Roman Catholics, but to all Americans.

In the words of author and blogger Rod Dreher, Vigano has, “Dropped an atomic bomb on Francis’s papacy.”

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