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Tag Archives: weinstein

Hugh Hewitt: The Ongoing Carnival of Venom

U.S. Senate

Addiction was the story of 2017. No: Not addiction to opioids, though of course tens of thousands of families are still mourning the death of a loved one to the scourge coursing through the United States.

 

No: Not addiction to the toxic combination of power and lust fueling the sexual misconduct scandals that burst onto the public stage in the name Harvey Weinstein.

 

And no, not an addiction to President Trump, either on the part of his adoring legions or his “worst enemies.”

 

No, the centerpiece addiction of the past year—which is widespread and still growing—is to outrage itself, to the state of being perpetually offended, to the need not only to be angry at someone or something, but also to always and everywhere be, well, hating.

 

We are all trapped in this ongoing carnival of venom, a national gathering of unpleasant souls.

 

This year, let’s throw the trend into reverse. The best way to start is a long look in the mirror.

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Albert Mohler: And What a Year it Was!

Headlines

It was the year that Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, and the year that Democrats declared “the Resistance.” The stock market continued to soar and the winds roared—it was the year of three devastating hurricanes.

 

Neil Gorsuch became the newest justice on the Supreme Court. Meanwhile, threats loomed in hot spots around the world, and the hottest of all was North Korea.

 

Controversy in U.S. sports centered on who did and who didn’t stand for the national anthem.

 

Harvey Weinstein was toppled in a sex abuse scandal, and was then followed by over 100 others, including a U.S. senator and several congressmen.

 

Those who died in 2017 included Charles Manson, Helmut Kohl, Glenn Campbell, Mary Tyler Moore, David Rockefeller, and R. C. Sproul. Meanwhile, just in the U.S., a new baby was born every 8 seconds.

 

May your house celebrate a happy New Year, in 2018.

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Michael Medved: What all the Abusers and Harassers Have in Common

Opioid

Recent charges of assault and harassment have destroyed powerful figures in every field of endeavor. These accusations have afflicted liberals and conservatives, straight and gay, black and white, with only one factor linking every one of the accused: they are all men. That’s not because women have no power to abuse: females occupy some commanding heights in politics, business and entertainment, yet no woman producer used a casting couch like Weinstein, and none of the 105 women in Congress have been accused of behavior like Franken‘s.

Females don’t feel the same impulse to force themselves on unwilling objects of desire, and any men subjected to such assaults are better equipped to resist. That’s not due to strength or size, but because of the obvious difference in the way males and females engage in sex.

Current headlines should force the Left to acknowledge an obvious point that they have long preferred to ignore: men and women are profoundly, unmistakably, undeniably different.

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Hugh Hewitt: Our Culture And The Sexual Misconduct Crisis

FISA

Sometimes we have to remind ourselves of the good thing that can come when a bad thing happens.

The recent wave of sexual misconduct is very disturbing.

We can probably call this “the Great Purge,” how American society woke up and rid itself of bad and boorish behavior—sometimes worse than bad and boorish, sometimes criminal—from men taking advantage of their powerful positions.

The good thing in all of this is the opportunities for recourse that are now being afforded young women who had been victimized, simply for wanting to get ahead in their careers.

Their stories are finally being believed and the bad actors, mostly men, are being forced to walk the gang plank.

The good thing inside the bad thing is that our daughters and even our sons will not be forced to endure this kind of behavior. They should be promoted based on merit and ability and hard work. Nothing more. Those taking advantage of them should indeed be purged.

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Michael Medved: When Political Correctness Tops Personal Decency

Opioid

The New York Times recently reported on allegations of shameless sexual harassment by Oscar-winning movie mogul Harvey Weinstein from dozens of young women.

In his bizarre response, Weinstein acknowledged that he “caused a lot of pain” and planned to temporarily step back from corporate power in order to concentrate on therapy. He also promised to compensate for his wrong-doing and “channel that anger” by launching a major campaign against the NRA, while pledging “to make a movie about our president” in order to force Trump’s retirement.

In other words, the guilt-ridden executive hoped for redemption by bashing political opponents rather than improving himself, implying that however badly he behaved, conservatives are worse. He thereby embraced the classic leftist fantasy: that political correctness matters more than destructive personal behavior, no matter how loathsome.

Emphasizing public posturing above private conduct can’t deliver either personal happiness or societal decency.

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