Tag Archives: white supremacy

Owen Strachan: Trump Takes Courageous Action Against Critical Race Theory

If you’re on a college campus today—or have a child on campus—there’s a solid chance you’ll hear this: “All white people are racist.” You might hear this, too: “America is founded on white supremacy.”

These two sentences are not mere overheated emotion. They express an ideology called Critical Race Theory—or CRT—which argues that race is a social construct made by white people. Just as race was once used to enslave and terrorize, so it is used today to keep America unequal, unfair, and hostile to minorities.

The Trump administration just took symbolic and courageous action against CRT. It issued a memo to federal agencies calling for the end of the government’s CRT “racial sensitivity trainings,” terming them “divisive, anti-American propaganda.”

Does America have real issues in its past? Yes.

Have we made real progress that we must guard carefully? Also yes.

The White House has led well here.

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Owen Strachan: Terrible Ideas Have Terrible Consequences

The tremendous violence in America migrated to an unlikely setting recently: The typically quiet city of Kenosha, Wisconsin. According to the Kenosha police department, out of 175 people arrested recently, 102 had a home address outside Kenosha, hailing from no less than 44 different cities.

What this means is that our cities are being torn apart by what amounts to a professional rioting class. These “protesters” are not merely upset; they are not merely decrying what they see as injustices. Those of the rioting class are genuine radicals—believing, per Critical Race Theory—that America is built upon a racist foundation. “White supremacy” represents the structure of this country, and so to cleanse America of it, American civilization must be torn down and rebuilt.

We are not merely witnessing “outrage” today. We are witnessing a focused attack on the fabric of America.

Terrible ideas have terrible consequences.

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Owen Strachan: Harvard Goes After Homeschooling

Picture the scene: several studious young children translate Latin, discuss Shakespeare, and consider polynomials together.

Would you think you’re looking at a seedbed of white supremacy?

That’s how a recent article from Harvard Magazine, entitled “The Risks of Homeschooling,” presents religious parents who practice homeschooling. Harvard Law professor Elizabeth Bartholet argues that homeschooling evangelicals are “extreme religious ideologues.” In her view, these fearsome fathers and mothers pose some sort of major threat to national health.

This paranoid perspective is not new. For over 100 years, figures like John Dewey have argued that the state, not the family, has the fundamental right to shape children. And—for over 100 years—Christians and many other fair-minded citizens have pushed back against this view, even if they have their kids in school.

After all: The family is the first institution—not the state.

You could well label homeschooling traditional.

It certainly is not extreme.

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Lanhee Chen: A Plea for Nuance in Polarized Times

Tax Reform

The views held by the protestors in the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia—the voices of white supremacy, neo-Nazi organizations and the KKK—have no place in our society.

But make no mistake: There are other—credible—voices on the political right in America today that have been marginalized on college campuses and other venues across our country. I’m thinking of voices and organizations that advocate for the life of the unborn child or for religious liberty, which have been shouted down or categorized as hate groups.

There is no moral equivalence between the views of white supremacists and the views held by those protesting against them. And the mainstream media should also be willing to differentiate between those white nationalists and, for example, today’s champions for religious liberty.

Many progressives may not like them, but they do not deserve to be mixed together with the vile hatred we saw in Charlottesville.

Nuance isn’t popular in today’s politics, but let’s not lose sight of the differences where they matter.

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